02 April 2014

The Artist And The Ego

Eastern Sky - Oil on canvas


A recent rejection was balanced with some glowing reviews of my art. This yin and yang of life lead me to ponder the roll of ego in an artist’s life.
Dave Ames said: "Trash and treasure are two sides of the same coin. Low self-esteem produces one, and public adulation the other."
I am genuinely surprised by positive reactions to my work, and am so grateful when another person forms a strong enough connection to my work to want to purchase it. I normally don't take rejection personally and can generally separate myself from my art, even though it is such a personal part of my inner being.
Ego is defined as "a person's sense of self-esteem or self-importance". Self-esteem is defined as "confidence in one's own worth or abilities; self-respect".
When talking to others about my surprise at positive critiques, I was asked how I keep working if I don't expect others to like my art or if I didn't think it was good. It's not that I don't think my work is good, exactly, but more that I'm unsure of how it measures up in the big scheme of things. When I begin a painting, I don't start it with the public in mind. I don't start it thinking about the ultimate sale. It starts from a deeply personal part of me. There is a need to create this story that end results are unimportant. It doesn't even matter at this stage if it's any good. It's all about the story and how it relates to my spirit. At this stage there is no separation from self.
When the painting is finished I will usually, though not always, put it out there for others to see and judge. I am able to separate myself from the work. When praise comes in it is because that person connects to the story of the painting, not because I have superb painting abilities. When criticism comes in it's because the story wasn't clear to that one person, or was one they could not identify with. Yes, it could also be from sloppy technical execution of the painting process for which I am responsible, but it is a criticism against the painting not myself as a human being.
My ego isn't very big, yet I have enough self-esteem to believe I can succeed if I work hard enough. I know my work has value, yet I know there are so many others who are better. When I paint, although I might enjoy the end results and feel I conveyed the emotion of the story well, I know where the flaws are and what can be improved. There may be technical aspects I'm unsure of. Sometimes I will love a painting and others don't think much of it. The opposite is true as well. I will hate a piece that the public seems to love. That is why it is so important for an artist to go beyond their own walls and expose their work to the criticism
The ego is a double-edged sword in art. An artist at once needs to believe in themselves and the work they are doing in order to promote it, and have the confidence to show it to others, but at the same time they need to separate themselves from the art to avoid total discouragement and quitting in disgust.
On the other end of the stick, is the danger of an artist becoming so full of themselves to the determinant of their own career.  Most stereotypes of artists are built around the big ego. This is the person that thinks they are a genius and every painting a masterpiece to be held up on a pedestal for all the world to see.
If I were to think like that what motivation would there be for me to learn, grow, and improve? The big ego would become stagnant and dull from a lack of growth.  They already believe themselves to be the best they could possibly be.
Instead my ego tells me there are many others better than me, and so lots more for me to learn. There are a lot more things for me to strive to achieve. Yet, the praise gives me the courage to cast a wider net and reach for some of those higher milestones that will propel my career forwards.